Sunday, 12 January 2014

Changes at Wells next the Sea

Thank you one and all  for your lovely 'get wells' for my finger. Welcome to my new follower via Bloglovin - Jenny Walshaw and on here DeAndrea.

For our walk this week, we decided to check the damage at Wells next the Sea, after the storm tidal surge back in December 2013. The biggest sand dune as you approach the beach from the life boat station, has been chopped in half and also lost a substantial amount of bulk:
The grass that grows in the dunes was everywhere including in many of these:
Several beach huts were washed away leaving just their supports:
This one lost its hut but not its stairs or balcony:
This group has been turned around and damaged:
Metres of sand has been removed, moved or simply swept away. The situation down towards Holkham was similar in its loss of dunes and habitat.  If you come here on holiday this year (and have been previously), these new views (and many more not photographed), await you.
 

13 comments:

  1. We walked along the quayside at Wells on New Year's Eve, and saw how many shops had been flooded- we didn't venture as far as the beach. So sorry for all this damage. The recent nearby helicopter crash was also very sad. I wonder how long it will take the sand dunes to recover their original shape [if ever?]

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    1. I gather the Lifeboat Station also took quite a battering but on this walk we turned left towards Holkham so didn't see what Wells looked like that side.

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  2. I've been to Wells and Holkham many times. Must have been a massive storm to do all that!

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    1. Love your new title Dan! Much damage was caused along the whole area. We don't live so close as to have been affected but it was bad and we heard of many people flooded out and even some whose homes fell off the cliffs.

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  3. That is such a shame, only a few months ago we were walking regularly along that part of the beach. I had not realised that the surge had hit Wells (or even Old Hunstanton) so badly. I guess it is nature, and in time we will get used to the new landscape?

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    1. As mentioned above, it was quite bad but not so much damage, death and destruction as 1953 due to improvement work.

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    2. That is so sad, but as you say, at least there wasn't the death and destruction as there was in 1953.

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  4. We had our fair share of problems on the coast here in Brighton, the benches were almost submerged in pebbles. Let's hope we've seen the last of it.
    Briony
    x

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    1. Was that in the weather this last week or so, or like us, early December surge?

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  5. Truly sad to see, though fortunately no loss of life. I just son't have the words to express my sorrow for those who have lost their homes, or had them ruined by the flood waters. We are so fortunate where we are, highly unlikely that we would be affected by any flooding - almost impossible I'd say. And the worry is that this is going to become a regular feature of winter for those affected communities.

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    1. We are indeed lucky! I think it really bad that those sitting near the edges of cliffs cannot get insurance so they lose everything:(

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  6. Hopefully all will be calm again now but the havoc the storm wreaked will no doubt leave its mark for some time to come. Sorry DC but I couldn't even read your post about your finger, being very squeamish. I do hope it is better now.
    Patricia x

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  7. Never mind Patricia and yes it is getting there. Today is the first day with a normal plaster on it. It was driving me mad trying to type.

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