Wednesday, 11 March 2015

What to do with yoghurt whey


A brand new batch of yoghurt was made, i.e., using freshly bought in starter as the previous few batches were way too softly set and needed straining a little before use. Although I have an electric yoghurt maker which can do it all in one go, we generally find we get a better set yoghurt (using semi-skimmed milk) if we heat the milk first. It goes in the microwave for 8 minutes on full. Once finished, it then sits in a bowl of cold water for around 13 minutes to bring it down to 40C when we add the starter:

As you start to use it, you will notice whey forming in little puddles:
Yoghurt whey is sour and acidic unlike cheese whey which is sweet but it can still be used rather than thrown down the sink causing an environmental impact, that I have only just found out. Every time you need to have some yoghurt, pour off the whey and store it in a jar in the fridge:
It will keep in there, safe and sound for at least one week if not longer. If you don't think you will use it straight away once your yoghurt is finished, freeze it in a suitable container. If you strain your yoghurt to make it Greek or into cream cheese, you will have even more to use.

Now why am I suggesting doing this? Well, it is due to a programme I watched last night. It was discussing the environmental damage done to local wildlife, rivers, streams, fauna and flora with the dumping of millions of tons of acidic whey from making Greek yoghurt.

Most sensible countries have now banned this practice but it got me thinking about those of us at home who may be doing a similar thing without realising the danger.

Yes, it is only a little bit we might be throwing away but collectively, as a nation, I bet it adds up to a huge amount and I for one, do not want to be responsible for damaging the environment, even a tiny bit, if I can help it!

If you search on the internet there are loads of ideas on what to do with yoghurt and cheese whey, varying due to their different natures. For example, yoghurt way can be used in baking, replacing all or some of the liquid you would normally use (this is what I do). It can be used as a fungicide, face and body treatment, given to acidic loving plants (might try this on my blueberries in small amounts).

Whey is full of useful things like Vitamin B12, B5, B1, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium,Selenium and Zinc amongst other good and beneficial things.


Here are some links to just a few ideas, but be careful, some talk about whey and don't say what type!

first web address 
second web address
third web address which includes some personal and garden uses

Hope you find this useful!

14 comments:

  1. Fancy that, I had no idea about the waste whey problem in the environment. But I have used it in scones simply because I don't like wasteage. Pouring it on the blueberries or the compost heap sounds good though, think I'll try that next time instead of furring up my drainage system....

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    1. Our garden soil is not acidic enough really for our blueberries and last year they had iron filings dug in this year though I shall try one cup of whey per gallon of water. It is also supposed to be a good fungicide!

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  2. This post is definitely food for thought, I must admit to pouring the whey from greek yogurt down the sink :-( I usually buy the big bucket tubs from Lidl and after the first day it starts to puddle on the yogurt. This will make me think carefully next time, I have a small clip top jar I could use and keep next to it in the fridge then use it in baking scones.

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    1. It really does add something to the flavour.

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  3. I use the whey for scones too. But with the Lidl buckets, I just stir it back in and eat it! blessings xx

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    1. Love in bread too, must try it in cakes and biscuits.

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  4. I meant to watch that programme and forgot completely. I'll search it out on Catch Up.

    I tend to use yogurt whey in scone making and it's good in pastry too, I've never thought to freeze it though- good tip.

    I knew about the damage any kind of dairy can do to the environment when disposed of in large amounts after watching a traffic programme, it showed a milk tanker that had overturned and the rush to stop the milk from getting into the drains. Local environmentalists were up in arms at the potential damage to the delicate Eco systems of the land around the crash site.

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    1. I used to throw it away, now I use it. It has such good things in it.

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  5. my neighbour keeps pigs on the whey produced from her goats cheese enterprise

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    1. Cheese whey is sweeter so no doubt they love it.

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  6. That is really interesting. I had no idea about whey wastage. :)

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    1. I knew there was a problem, just not sure what or how bad.

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  7. Interesting and such a waste of whey. I've never thought of separating the whey but just mix it every time I scoop out the yogurt to eat.

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    1. If we don't separate our whey as it forms, it gives our home made yoghurt too sour a taste.

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