Friday, 14 August 2015

DB's project is finished!

He has been busy beavering away on this project for me, no-one could guess what it was, although a few thought of a laundry hanger - which got DB thinking:)

Well, now it can be revealed. This is one of its 4 corners:
Door stop feet on the back to protect walls - metal rods bent so they don't drop out when it is turned:
He even carved a little heart for me on the top - the filled in circle was where a hole was on the original piece of used wood:
Here it is in its entirety:

It is a rag rug loom! Isn't he clever:) Don't know what one is - check on-line. They are variable in design but relatively easy to make. Although you can't see them, the bottom of the metal rods are held in place by mini butterfly clips.

We dismantled an outdoor twin seat and table set, using any wood that was still intact. The rest has gone into our wood store for kindling. We had to buy galvanised nails, large eyes, small eyes as we didn't have enough required (or in a good enough condition to use) plus two metal rods which we bought from a steam fair for just £6 for the two. All in all, I reckon it cost no more than £14 to make, plus DB's time of course! They retail for far more than that.

What isn't shown is another short piece of wood with eyes and nails in that will allow me to make a shorter rug without having to take the whole thing apart, it just slides in and is held into place.

Can't wait to get started as I already have enough fabric to make the first carpet. Let the 'stringing' and weaving begin. Have a lovely weekend everyone!

15 comments:

  1. How clever and resourceful of him! Enjoy using it, will look forward to the results!

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    1. I'm just attempting to string it now ready to use, more on another post.

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  2. Ooh, very nice!
    My grandmother was a Geordie and taught me to make rag rugs, but I always make a 'proggy rug' using hessian and a rugger tool. I still have Nana's rugger, which she inherited from her mum, it must have made dozens, if not hundreds of rugs and it's still going strong!
    Your loom looks lovely though, and making the rug should be easier on your hands than doing a 'proggy' one!

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    1. I normally make rag rugs using rug canvas and a locker hook, reasonable quick and easy. Hopefully, this will be easier still once I get to grips with it all!

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  3. I look forward to seeing this in use, I have never used a frame but it sounds as though it will make it easier on the shoulders.

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    1. I have just done 3 rows (made loads of mistakes and had to back track), my shoulders are aching a little and I am standing. Most seem to sit but mine is taller than theirs.

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  4. What in heaven's name is a rag rug loom (try saying that when you've had a few!) I thought you just pushed bits of rag through a hessian cloth with a hooky thing. Didn't know you need a loom to make a rag rug! My, you learn something every day! I'd have prefer the drying rack myself, but then, I'm not a crafter. Only joking, if that's what you wanted ... but did you ask for this? Wasn't it meant to be a lovely Welsh dresser and he ran out of wood and so made you a loom?
    Margaret P

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    1. There are many ways to make rag rugs, i usually use a locker hook and rug canvas. That got too expensive so I have also used small square garden netting. Haven't yet used hessian.

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  5. Great idea, looking forward to seeing your first carpet xxxx

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    1. Might be a long while, made a mistake on the second row, took ages to sort out!

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  6. I have wanted Hubby to make me one for awhile now. Can't complain too much though as he has rebuilt the deck, built another fence down another side of our property, and expanded the fire pit area.

    He is now thinking about making me a very narrow desk type thing to attach my knitting machine to so I can work in the main room.

    Perhaps in a year or two I will get my rug loom.

    God bless.

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    1. Blimey, well done hubby. I'm sure he will make you one soon. The actual crafting of it took a very short time. It was putting on three layers of oil etc that took the time. Most looms are made of basic pine so are quick.

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  7. I have a small one my husband made me, I need to practice more on it. The last one I tried was wonky. I like the design of yours, he did a great job!

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    1. The secret seems to be getting the turn at the edges right (which I mess up occasionally) the metal poles at the sides help as does pushing all the rows upwards to level them off.

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  8. This is going to be very interesting . . . I'm looking forward to seeing your first project.
    Tell DB, well gone, it looks marvelous!
    Your blogging sister,
    Connie :)

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