Thursday, 27 November 2014

Congratulations and just in case....

Congratulations to Andy and Kim on your engagement, you said you would keep it quiet and private and you did. Let us hope the media don't harass you both too much!

Every year, come late autumn early winter, I prepare for the worst weather possible just in case. DB smiles at me as every year he has been correct and nothing too untoward has happened. However, the year our son was born was a different matter.

In that January I went into labour 9 days earlier than expected, mind you I had been using a mini sledge hammer to put some posts into the garden the previous day:) We had only moved into our house 3 weeks previously so luckily, had just done a big shop to save going out for anything and to concentrate on the baby!

The day I went in the weather was beautiful, a cool but sunny day with blue skies and white clouds. When I awoke the next morning and went to look out of the hospital window, it had snowed overnight. Boy had it snowed. I know those of you living in cold climates get way more snow than us so you might smile at this bit. Sitting on the porch roof just below our ward window was deep snow, nearly 12" of it!

All of us listened to the weather forecast, each bursting into tears like you do, when we realised no-one would be able to get in to visit if they lived outside the town, like us:(

Come visiting time that evening (no-one had gotten in for the afternoon visit except a few very local people), DB strolled in carrying a huge bouquet of flowers and yes, I burst into tears at the shock and delight of seeing him.

In those days, you were expected to stay in hospital for a whole week after giving birth unless you had more children at home - experience I guess. Well we didn't, each day the sky went grey and each day it snowed, just a little more. However, 4 days later the weather forecast was awful and we were all told if we didn't go home that day we would have to stay.

I phoned up DB and he said the conditions were getting bad in our village but he would do his best. Ages later, he turned up and we proudly walked out of the hospital, carrying our slightly yellowing  baby (he had mild jaundice but was fine to go home).

The drive home was horrendous, he had thought to put a blanket and Thermos flask in the car just in case but in those days we had no mobile phones. Crossing our fingers we set off. All the roads had been cleared except the one to our village but they were very icy. When we got to where we needed to turn off there were just two rapidly disappearing tracks down the middle of the road. Saying a prayer we carried on (just in case you were wondering if we were being stupid at this point, there were several cars in the distance, both in front and behind and a tractor was at the back of the queue).

The noise of the snow and ice scraping the bottom of the car was very loud but eventually, travelling at about 15 - 20 miles per hour we arrived home safely. The snow was now coming down hard and we hurriedly got DS, me and everything else into the house and the car into the garage.

Here he is a few weeks later sitting in his car seat - yes, they really were that sparse all those years ago and with no neck support!

Part Two next time! Welcome to Katie Weston via here and Bethan Palmer via Bloglovin.


10 comments:

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    1. He was wasn't he, lot bigger now!

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  2. What a lovely story (or at least part one of a lovely story). Glad you managed to get home safe.

    Life was so different 'back in the day' wasn't it. I used to think my eldest was safer in my arms in the back seat than in his car seat. Seeing how vulnerable their little necks were from your photo, even the most minor of bumps would surely have hurt them :-(

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    1. Frightening really wasn't it! We initially thought well they must know what they are doing but eventually we put something soft either side to keep his head in the middle.

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  3. That strikes a chord, DS at 6 weeks old needing admitting for urgent oxygen and feeding tube due to bronchiolitis and ambulance not being able to get to us due to snow (in London!). Ended up finding a 4x4 taxi who took me most of the way, and then I just got out, stuck DS in the sling, did my puffa coat up around us both and walked the rest of the way. Even now snow gives me the heebie jeebies in case one of us needs hospital and can't get there :(

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    1. Amazing they survived really isn't it but you certainly did the right thing in getting him to hospital no matter what the weather threw at you.

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  4. I think we used to put a carry cot into the back seat of the car and strap it in before car seats were around.
    Which year were you almost stuck in hospital?
    I wonder what this winter will be like, still only 1 frost here so far.

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    1. 1986/7/ My nephew is is 42 used to go around on the back seat in his carry cot, no straps at all in their car! 2 frosts here so far, more to come I suspect as winter marches on. Last year, our lowest night time temperature was -12C I think and the day was -4C.

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  5. Oh, isn't he gorgeous! I remember K not having a headrest in her carseat. Thankfully things had improved by the time I had KL 7 years later, though I had to buy the headrest separately.

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    1. He was and is, but then I'm biased!

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