Monday, 15 June 2015

One of the things I like

About being frugal is any money saved can be used for whatever it is needed for. It might be to allow you to eat, pay a bill, go on holiday, put into an emergency fund, or in this case, save towards something. First of all though, a warm welcome to Jackie Connelly via Bloglovin.

I already have a sewing machine but it is one of those things I was persuaded to buy at a stitching show, many years ago, back in the day when money was no problem. You know the kind of machine, an all powerful, singing and dancing type that quite frankly, drives me nuts.  I have never been able to fully get to grips with its bobbin winding. I know, such a simply thing yet I get so irate by the nth attempt that I simply cannot enjoy sewing and usually give up. DB always has to come and do it and that cheeses me off even more:(

I was going to sell it to raise the funds needed to get a simpler machine but because of its power, it will come in handy for tackling big projects - bobbin winding notwithstanding:(, such as putting together and sewing through all the layers of a quilt. Also, DDiL will be able to use it for big projects as well.

Anyhow, now we are using less money on food, I have been saving the difference every month, along with any other titbits and finally had enough saved to go and buy another one.

We have a sewing machine centre quite near us and whilst out the other day, DB suggested we go have a look as he was getting quite fed up of wading through the blue air at home generated by me in the sewing room!

I'm always a little wary of places like this as they can try foisting you off with whatever they need to shift but I took my time and we have been into them before for supplies. I said what I needed and he started me off with a simple machine before showing me another one that did a little bit more but which also came with some great quilting gadgets, free!

However, although I was tempted by said machine and gadgets, in the end I chose the first one he showed me as it just felt better. Anyway, if necessary, I can save and buy gadgets if really needed.

My, how we change with age, I would have been swayed by gadgets once upon a time. Anyhow, the one I went for is a Brother Innov Is 10A.

It has a neat push button to sew but also comes with a foot pedal if I prefer. I think sewing with a button will take a bit of time to get used to but once out the package, I sat down to fill a bobbin and it just did it, no problems and within a short time, was merrily practising sewing with it.

DB had to help with the automatic needle threader as we thought it was broken. It was our fault though, although the needle looked up but it wasn't fully up, once we realised our mistake it was fine.

Physically, it is smaller and lighter but does have a metal rather than a plastic 'skeleton'. If it works as fine as it did first time, I shall be very pleased and already feel far more relaxed even thinking about sewing!

14 comments:

  1. It looks gorgeous, and Brother products are usually very reliable.
    One little comment- I notice it is a 'top drop in ' style bobbin. When I got my new machine with that, the lady threw in a pack of 10 plastic bobbins. She said that if you use metal bobbins in the newer machines it can affect the working. [I had loads of metal ones already] I have NO IDEA if that is true, but have never dared use my older bobbins in the machine in case I spoil it! Reading your post has reminded me that I ought to check if her statement is true.
    Have lots of fun with your new toy [sorry - it is not a toy, it is an essential tool in your armoury] blessings x

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    1. Thanks for that Angela. I was given a new Brother by the family at Christmas and have been using plastic ( that came with it) and metal alike. I shall cease forthwith and save the metal ones for the treadle.

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    2. Good luck with the Brother, I have a new one and am very pleased with it.

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  2. It came with 4 plastic bobbins and I bought another 10 plus a 1/4" seam foot for quilting. Don't even have to deal with the bobbin, just drop it in, pull the thread around a groove in the top and it does the rest by itself!

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  3. I've been using Brother knitting machines for many years, and they're super quality and very reliable, so hopefully your sewing machine will be a brilliant investment.
    I bought myself an all singing, all dancing Pfaff computerised sewing machine a while ago, and it's wonderful, but I'm not a born needlewoman, so every time I decide on a sewing project, the name is singularly appropriate, it's a 'faff'! I can handle the 'computer' bit of it with no problem, but have no patience with the actual cutting, lining up, pressing part of sewing! I think DDiL is going to get the machine soon, she's far more likely to use it, it's more or less gathering dust here!

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    1. My big machine is a Pfaff 2056, hardly used for fancy stitching but it is a good machine. The shop was only going to give me £100 as a trade in. Thought that was way too little so shall keep it.

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    2. £100 trade in offer was an insult! I'd have kept it too at that price! I wonder just how much the shop would have sold it on for? A lot more than the £100 they offered you I should imagine!

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  4. It sounds like my sort of machine. The one I have is ancient bought in 1979 when I was making clothes for me and our first daughter and curtains, upholstery for the home.Once retired I will invest in a few new bits and pieces to help with my crafting.

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    1. It is classed as an entry level computerised machine which is fine for what I want.

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  5. Just the info I needed, really helpful as my sewing machine fell apart ( literally) when I got it out to use last time and I'm hoping to get a new one soon. Simple is just what I need.

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    1. So far this seems simple and I hope to soon be sewing squares for quilting.

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  6. My last electric one was a Brother ( lasted over 20 years and a lot of sewing) and so is my new electric; bog standard, very basic and around 60 quid from Hobbycraft, which suited me well, both in terms of what it can do and also in terms of price. It can only do straightline, zig-zag stitching and buttonholes, though I always make my buttonholes by hand anyway as they are stronger and neater than any I've ever attempted to make using a machine, thanks to Mrs Rae, my sewing teacher at school from 1976-1981. She taught me well, and I still have all of my notes and samples from my 2 years 'O' level work.

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    1. I must have done hand buttonholes at school but can't remember. Haven't yet attempted them by machine.

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  7. I learned to sew on a Brother machine years ago - the only thing was it was a huge industrial machine that went at lightning speed from the tiniest bit of pressure on the foot pedal! My small machine that I have now feels extremely sluggish in comparison but it was a great way to learn!

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