Saturday, 16 October 2021

Preparations still ongoing

Oil tank filled, log stores full, papers for lighting the fire, still collecting. DB is chopping kindling each day, trying to get our kindling store sorted out a bit more.

So far I have preserved piccalilli, marmalade, green tomato chutney, mincemeat and jam. I shall do one more lot of marmalade then that may be enough.

My Brexit box, which came in useful for the early months of lockdown, has been filled up and then some. People think I am strange but I really don't care. Its not just about preparing for winter anymore, its preparing for whatever. Not some imaginary apocalypse scenario but food shortages/mega increases in food, fuel and other items or possible energy shortages. 

Forewarned is forearmed. If buying items now to squirrel away is seen as foolish, guess I am a fool? No, I am simply buying now to help those price hikes not hurt so much in the future. We have lived through hard times and can do so again. 

We know how to conserve our water supply, how to reduce our fuel bill, cook from scratch, keep warm, and clean our homes with just a few items rather than a ton of sprays, full of chemicals.

It occured to me the other day to go through my digital bookmarks, for recipes I am interested in and get them either printed out or written into a recipe book. Hints and tips on all kinds of problems also need to be jotted down. 

Have you ever thought what would happen if the internet/power went down for a prolonged period of time. We wouldn't be able to shop as neither the tills nor your bank cards would work. Cash can't be gotten hold off and even if you had some, where could you spend it? Stocktaking is all done via the tills. What goes out needs to be brought back in etc.

No power for days on end, heat, lights, cooking? A family member lives in an all electric bungalow. I have persuaded her to buy a small flat camping stove to boil water for hot drinks, filling hot water bottles to keep warm, simple food cooking. She will be buying extra candles, lanterns and a head torch. She has loads of batteries for items already.

Think about it, are you prepared?


16 comments:

  1. Candles is one thing I haven't got many of now, other than a few tealights, so thanks for reminding me to stock up. Could do with a battery lantern too, as well as another torch - and the batteries, of course. We do have power cuts on a fairly regular basis here, although they don't usually last long. But who knows what might happen in the future?!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am aiming to buy another battery operated lamp, hurricane style.

      Delete
  2. I think you’re wise and I am doing the same thing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. We live in South Africa and Scotland, for a number of years, I have lost count, we have been getting load shedding in SA. Load shedding is when there is not enough power to go round they switch some area off, we even have an app to tell us when. In the beginning shops etc used to close but now when the light go out you just stand still and within a couple of seconds the generator has clicked in and everybody carries on. At home I have a gas camping stove and a converter that runs a table lamp and the tv. If I have the bread maker on I just move it to the lounge and plug it in. We also have water problems as very little maintenance has been done in recent years, the complex I live in has a back up tank and I also have 1000 Leyte rainwater tank in the garden. The climate is sub tropical so no heating but we do miss the air on if it goes of at night. I think you are right to be prepared some tins that you can use would be good as you should not open your freezer as that lets the cold air out. We were without electric for three days once and the freezer was fine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How interesting about load sharing. Here as I am sure you know, it’s either on or off! Yes, I was wondering about how many days for a freezer. I think a chest would last longer than an upright though.

      Delete
  4. I agree with all you say. So far we have not had too many shortages, but have seen major increases in pricing. I am busy stocking up and the next time I go shopping I will be picking up more batteries, candles, small propane bottles for the camp stove and some other (as some might think) weird items. Being prepared is just what one needs to do.

    God bless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My shopping bill is at least 1/3rd more, twice more when stocking up. I shall keep on.

      Delete
  5. We bought a whole house generator, peace of mind if our power goes out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A good idea and I have looked at them, especially for the freezers. Not common over here though our previous neighbours had one, drove everybody mad:(

      Delete
  6. A small reminder to do stock rotation on your goods.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Every item is date labelled and rotated. New stuff goes behind unless it is older when I buy it. Thanks for the reminder.

      Delete
  7. No I don't feel very prepared at all in my new home. Back on the smallholding it was a different matter, solar power and battery back-up, our own water reserves, wood burner etc etc. Here one small power cut the other week showed us both how different things are.

    Even the combi-boiler only runs WITH an electricity supply, so no heating, no hot water and no cooking. I had lots of candles and matches to hand and Alan had his rechargeable torch ... yes I pointed out the error in that straight away to him! Time to get some batteries ready for next time he said.

    Of course I'm okay for food, but I do need to make sure I have some way of heating things up or at the very least keep a stash of food that doesn't need cooking at all.

    As for prices they are shooting up, and thinking about it our only way of shopping if there was a long power outage would be on the little indoor market in the centre of town or the once a week outdoor market where cash is still king at both and the tills are the basic sort that can be opened by the secret little button.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, proper manual tills, a thing of beauty. This is what I asked my sister to buy:
      https://www.millets.co.uk/15895048/campingaz-camp-bistro-2-stove-15895048/?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Shopping&gclid=Cj0KCQjwtrSLBhCLARIsACh6RmjtRzpWux1HCXZqtE12-Py5csH_1K5JVr7LuId7H5WrC_3M7VV6shkaAp-9EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

      Delete
  8. I agree with you. We have done the same as far as preparation. Here in the U.S. I am seeing real shortages in my area on canned foods,paper products and the meat prices could make one faint. Luckily we do not eat much meat! I think Covid made a lot of us rethink our pantry storage. My grandmother always kept food stores having lived through World War One and Two as well as the Depression. Even at 91 she had a stocked storeroom. I'm glad I learned some of her ways. I love your blog - thank you for sharing ideas and thoughts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Yes I think we can learn a lot from previous generations.

      Delete

I love hearing from you, will read all your comments and try and answer any questions you leave. Please leave comments in English. Don't forget to come back and read my reply! All comments are moderated so if you try to link it to a commercial web site, it will not be published.